What Is Nutrition?

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.

- Michael Pollan, Unhappy Meals, New York Times, 2007-01-28

Podcast of the Day

Fat, sugar, salt - we all know we should eat less of them, and take more exercise, but as a nation with an ever expanding waistline we are becoming increasingly overweight.

Jim al-Khalili talks to Professor Susan Jebb, the UK's authority on obesity, who has spent much of her career trying to help us put those good intentions into practice.

Her challenge is not for the faint hearted. When she first got interested in obesity, as a research scientist, rates were already on the rise. Yet no one took the problem seriously. Today, with over sixty percent of adults overweight or obese, Susan remains unwavering in her commitment to ensuring we do.

As Professor of Diet and Population Health at Oxford University and Chair of the government's Responsibility Deal Food Network, she wants all of us and the food industry to improve the nation's health by translating the science of what we eat into practice.

And health is what it's all about. Obesity now poses such a danger that it's been dubbed the 'new smoking'.

Listen to The Life Scientific episode on Nutrition

Video of the Day

Short Article of the Day

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.

That, more or less, is the short answer to the supposedly incredibly complicated and confusing question of what we humans should eat in order to be maximally healthy...

Continue reading Michael Pollan's article: Unhappy Meals

Further Reading

Nutrition is the science that interprets the interaction of nutrients and other substances in food in relation to maintenance, growth, reproduction, health and disease of an organism. It includes food intake, absorption, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism and excretion.

The diet of an organism is what it eats, which is largely determined by the availability, the processing and palatability of foods. A healthy diet includes preparation of food and storage methods that preserve nutrients from oxidation, heat or leaching, and that reduce risk of foodborne illness.

A poor diet can cause deficiency diseases such as blindness, anemia, scurvy, preterm birth, stillbirth and cretinism; health-threatening conditions like obesity and metabolic syndrome; and such common chronic systemic diseases as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis...

Continue reading the Wikipedia article on Nutrition

Related Topics

Genetics | The Human Body

Each day I post the best introductory resources I can find on an important philosophical, scientific or historical topic. By collecting the best educational content the internet has to offer, I hope to make it as easy as possible for everyone to get into the habit of learning something valuable every day. If you’d like to join me, simply enter your email below:

Do you know of a  great introductory video, podcast, or article that deserves to be featured? Get in touch on Twitter or Facebook.