The Seven Best Philosophical Books on Death

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This page contains a list of the seven best philosophical books on death. Finding good introductory philosophy books can be difficult for two reasons. First, searching google for recommendations usually doesn’t bring up anything useful. Second, phrases like “best books on death” are ambiguous. One person may be looking for a short, beginner friendly introduction, someone else may want a comprehensive academic overview, a third person may be looking for classic works on death. This list tries to account for this ambiguity by recommending different types of books on the …

23 Philosophical Quotes on Death (With References)

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This page contains a collection of philosophical quotes on death, arranged in roughly chronological order. These quotes are all genuine and details about the author, book, chapter number, and translation are included where applicable. Quotes that begin with a section of bold text are my personal favourites. Without further ado, here are 23 philosophical quotes on death: Fear of death is indeed the pretence of wisdom, and not real wisdom, being a pretence of knowing the unknown; and no one knows whether death, which men in their fear apprehend to …

Pleasure as the Highest Good – a short reading from Epicurus’ ‘Letter to Menoeceus’

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Introduction In this passage from the Letter to Menoeceus, Epicurus (341 – 270 B.C.), summarizes two of his most famous ethical doctrines: that death should not be feared and that pleasure is the highest good. However, pleasure for Epicurus is not the indulgence of fine foods, drinking beer, and sex. Pleasure is simply the absence of pain. So for Epicurus, a simple life of quiet contemplation is the most pleasurable and therefore ideal life. Reading Let no one be slow to seek wisdom when he is young nor weary in …

Socrates on Death and Virtue – a short reading from the ‘Apology’ by Plato

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“Men of Athens, I honor and love you; but I shall obey God rather than you, and while I have life and strength I shall never cease from the practice and teaching of philosophy” Introduction In the year 399 B.C., in Athens, Socrates was brought to trial on charges of impiety and corrupting the youth. He was found guilty and condemned to death. The Apology, written by Plato, is an account of Socrates’ trial. In the previous passage, Socrates recalls how an oracle once proclaimed that he was the wisest …