The Philosophy of Immanuel Kant: A Collection of Online Resources and Key Quotes

Lennox Johnson Resources

This page aims to make learning about the philosophy of Immanuel Kant as easy as possible by bringing together the best articles, podcasts, and videos from across the internet onto one page. To get started, simply choose one of the resources listed below, or browse a selection of key quotes by Kant at the bottom of the page.

Encyclopedia Articles

This section features articles from the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The SEP is probably the most comprehensive online philosophy resource. It features in-depth articles on a huge number of philosophical topics, however, it is aimed at an academic audience and may be too detailed and technical for beginners. The IEP is generally more beginner-friendly but is also considered to be less reliable. Wikipedia is also an option, but it is much less reliable than either of these.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Articles

This section features short articles written by professional philosophers and aimed at a general audience. These articles are ideal for anyone looking for a shorter or more beginner-friendly introduction to Kant than the encyclopedia articles listed above.

1000-Word Philosophy

OUP Blog

Podcasts

This section features episodes from leading philosophy podcasts. These are also aimed at a general audience and are a good option for beginners who prefer audio content.

Philosophy Bites

In Our Time

The Partially Examined Life

Short Videos (<30 mins)

This section features short videos aimed at beginners.

Wireless Philosophy

BBC Radio 4

Lectures/Longer Videos (>30 mins)

This section features longer videos and lectures. These tend to be less beginner-friendly and aimed at a more academic audience.

Course Syllabi

This section features a selection of university course syllabi. Browsing course syllabi can be a useful way to find reading recommendations.

Book Recommendations

This section features requests for book recommendations on philosophy forums. These can also be useful to browse when trying to find reading recommendations.

Books

There is only so much that you can learn using free online resources. This section features books that may be useful if you’re looking to learn more about Kant. This list was created using the books featured in the course syllabi and forum recommendations above.

Courses

This section features online courses on Kant.

Quotes

This section features a selection of key quotes by Kant.


It has hitherto been assumed that our cognition must conform to the objects; … Let us then make the experiment whether we may not be more successful in metaphysics, if we assume that the objects must conform to our cognition.

– Critique of Pure Reason, Preface to the Second Edition


Without sensibility no object would be given to us, without understanding no object would be thought. Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind. … The understanding can intuit nothing, the senses can think nothing. Only through their union can knowledge arise.

– Critique of Pure Reason, A 51/B75


Thus the order and regularity in the appearances, which we entitle nature, we ourselves introduce.

– Critique of Pure Reason, A 125


I have no knowledge of myself as I am, but merely as I appear to myself.

– Critique of Pure Reason, B 158


It is precisely in knowing its limits that philosophy consists.

– Critique of Pure Reason, A727/B 755


Nothing can possibly be conceived in the world, or even out of it, which can be called good, without qualification, except a good will. Intelligence, wit, judgement, and the other talents of the mind, however they may be named, or courage, resolution, perseverance, as qualities of temperament, are undoubtedly good and desirable in many respects; but these gifts of nature may also become extremely bad and mischievous if the will which is to make use of them, and which, therefore, constitutes what is called character, is not good.

– Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals, sect. 1


There is therefore but one categorical imperative, namely, this: Act only on that maxim whereby thou canst at the same time will that it should become a universal law.

– Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals, sect. 2


So act as to treat humanity, whether in thine own person or in that of any other, in every case as an end withal, never as means only.

– Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals, sect 2


Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe, the oftener and the more steadily we reflect on them: the starry heavens above and the moral law within.

– Critique of Practical Reason, pt. 2, Conclusion


Out of wood so crooked and perverse as that which man is made of, nothing absolutely straight can ever be wrought.

– Idea of a Universal History on a Cosmopolitical Plan, 6


Taste is the faculty of judging an object or a method of representing it by and entirely disinterested satisfaction or dissatisfaction. The object of such satisfaction is called beautiful.

– Critique of Judgement


Enlightenment is man’s emergence from his self-incurred immaturity. Immaturity is the inability to use one’s own understanding without the guidance of another. This immaturity is self-incurred if its cause is not lack of understanding, but lack of resolution and courage to use it without the guidance of another. The motto of enlightenment is therefore: Sapere aude! [Dare to know!] Have courage to use your own understanding!

– What is Enlightenment?


The Daily Idea aims to make learning about philosophy as easy as possible by bringing together the best philosophy resources from across the internet. To get started, check out this organized collection of 400+ articles, podcasts, and videos on a wide range of philosophical topics.

If you’re looking for an easy way to learn more about philosophy, sign up below to get a thought-provoking philosophical quote delivered to your inbox each day, along with links to relevant resources to help you learn more. You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter.