The Eight Best Books on or by Cicero

Lennox Johnson Books Leave a Comment

This page contains a list of the best books on or by Cicero. Just to be clear, there is no single best book on Cicero. The best book for you will depend on your preferred learning style and the amount of time that you want to spend reading about Cicero. An 800-page scholarly overview is unlikely to be best for someone looking for a short beginner-friendly introduction, for example. This list aims to take this ambiguity into account by featuring books that will appeal to a variety of learning styles.

Secondly, this is not a list of personal recommendations. It was created by compiling recommendations from a variety of online sources including bibliographies, course syllabi, and community recommendations. You can find out more about this process here. Links to the sources used to create this list are at the end of the post. Following these links will help you quickly find a wider range of options if the listed books do not fit what you are looking for.

Here are the best books on or by Cicero in no particular order.

Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome’s Greatest Politician – Anthony Everitt

Category: Biography | Length: 400 pages | Published: 2003

He squared off against Caesar and was friends with young Brutus. He advised the legendary Pompey on his somewhat botched transition from military hero to politician. He lambasted Mark Antony and was master of the smear campaign, as feared for his wit as he was for exposing his opponents’ sexual peccadilloes. Brilliant, voluble, cranky, a genius of political manipulation but also a true patriot and idealist, Cicero was Rome’s most feared politician, one of the greatest lawyers and statesmen of all times. Machiavelli, Queen Elizabeth, John Adams and Winston Churchill all studied his example. No man has loomed larger in the political history of mankind.

In this dynamic and engaging biography, Anthony Everitt plunges us into the fascinating, scandal-ridden world of ancient Rome in its most glorious heyday. Accessible to us through his legendary speeches but also through an unrivaled collection of unguarded letters to his close friend Atticus, Cicero comes to life in these pages as a witty and cunning political operator.

Selected Works – Cicero

Category: Anthology | Length: 272 pages

Lawyer, philosopher, statesman and defender of Rome’s Republic, Cicero was a master of eloquence, and his pure literary and oratorical style and strict sense of morality have been a powerful influence on European literature and thought for over two thousand years in matters of politics, philosophy, and faith. This selection demonstrates the diversity of his writings, and includes letters to friends and statesmen on Roman life and politics; the vitriolic Second Philippic Against Antony; and his two most famous philosophical treatises, On Duties and On Old Age – a celebration of his own declining years. Written at a time of brutal political and social change, Cicero’s lucid ethical writings formed the foundation of the Western liberal tradition in political and moral thought that continues to this day.

Orations – Cicero

Category: Classic | Length: 512 pages

The greatest orator of the late Roman Republic, Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.), influenced the course of European letters for centuries after his death. Through his writings, Renaissance and Enlightenment scholars encountered the riches of Classical rhetoric and philosophy. The elegance of his style, his skill and erudition, his worldly wisdom, and his profound humanity made Cicero a model for latter-day thinkers and keep his works ever relevant.

This collection presents examples of rhetoric from throughout the ancient Roman’s illustrious career. Selections include a series of famous speeches delivered during Cicero’s term as consul which thwarted the Catiline conspiracy to overthrow the Republic — but led to his own prosecution and exile. The compilation concludes with the bold orations delivered in defiance of Marc Anthony, which sealed Cicero’s doom.

Tusculan Disputations – Cicero

Category: Classic | Length: 624 pages

Cicero (Marcus Tullius, 106–43 BCE), Roman lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, of whom we know more than of any other Roman, lived through the stirring era which saw the rise, dictatorship, and death of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic. In his political speeches especially and in his correspondence we see the excitement, tension and intrigue of politics and the part he played in the turmoil of the time. Of about 106 speeches, delivered before the Roman people or the Senate if they were political, before jurors if judicial, 58 survive (a few of them incompletely). In the fourteenth century Petrarch and other Italian humanists discovered manuscripts containing more than 900 letters of which more than 800 were written by Cicero and nearly 100 by others to him. These afford a revelation of the man all the more striking because most were not written for publication. Six rhetorical works survive and another in fragments. Philosophical works include seven extant major compositions and a number of others; and some lost. There is also poetry, some original, some as translations from the Greek.

On the Commonwealth and On the Laws – Cicero

Category: Classic | Length: 262 pages

Cicero’s On the Commonwealth and On the Laws are his most important works of political philosophy. The present volume offers a scholarly reconstruction of the fragments of On the Commonwealth and a masterly translation of both dialogues. The texts are supported by a helpful, concise introduction, notes and other aids. Students in politics, philosophy, ancient history, law and classics will gain a new understanding of this seminal thinker thanks to Professor Zetzel’s volume.

De Officiis – Cicero

Category: Classic | Length: 288 pages

Cicero wrote On Obligations (De Officiis) in late 44 BC after the assassination of Julius Caesar to provide principles of behavior for aspiring politicians. It has subsequently played a seminal role in the formation of ethical values in western Christendom. Adopted by the fourth-century Christian humanists, it became transmuted into the moral code of the high Middle Ages. Thereafter, in the Renaissance from the time of Petrarch, and in the Age of Enlightenment that followed, it was given central prominence in discussion of the government of states. Today, when corruption and conflict in political life are the focus of so much public attention, On Obligations is still the foremost guide to good conduct. This new edition is based on a more systematic examination of the vast manuscript tradition than has previously been attempted, and shows with new clarity the major contribution to the improvement of the text made by scribes and readers of the later manuscripts, both in the Middle Ages and in the Renaissance.

On Moral Ends – Cicero

Category: Classic | Length: 196 pages

This new translation makes one of the most important texts in ancient philosophy freshly available to modern readers. Cicero was an intelligent and well-educated amateur philosopher, and in this work he presents the major ethical theories of his time in a way designed to get the reader philosophically engaged in the important debates. Raphael Woolf’s translation does justice to Cicero’s argumentative vigor as well as to the philosophical ideas involved, while Julia Annas’ introduction and notes provide a clear and accessible explanation of the philosophical context of the work.

The Nature of the Gods – Cicero

Category: Classic | Length: 288 pages

Cicero’s philosophical works are now exciting renewed interest and more generous appreciation, in part because they provide vital evidence of the views of the (largely lost) Greek philosophers of the Hellenistic age, and partly because of the light they cast on the intellectual life of first-century Rome. The Nature of the Gods is a central document in this area, for it presents a detailed account of the theologies of the Epicureans and of the Stoics, together with the critical objections to these doctrines raised by the Academic school.


The following sources were used to build this list:

University Course Syllabi:

Bibliographies:

Other Recommendations:


The Daily Idea aims to make learning about philosophy as easy as possible by bringing together the best philosophy resources from across the internet. To get started, check out this organized collection of 400+ articles, podcasts, and videos on a wide range of philosophical topics.

If you’re looking for an easy way to learn more about philosophy, sign up below to get a thought-provoking philosophical quote delivered to your inbox each day, along with links to relevant resources to help you learn more. You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *